International broadcasting bands on shortwaves

Raffaello Tesi

Here follows a list of the shortwave broadcasting bands, modification of the content found on Wikipedia.

Most international broadcasters use amplitude modulation with a stepping of 5 kHz between channels; a few use single sideband modulation.

  • 11 meters 25.670–26.100 MHz – Very little broadcasting activity in this band. Day reception tends to be poor, night reception nonexistent.
  • 13 meters21.450–21.850 MHz – Somewhat shaky day reception, very little night. Similar case to 11 metres, but long distance daytime broadcasting keeps this band humming in the Asia-Pacific region.
  • 15 meters18.900–19.020 MHz – Seldom used.
  • 16 meters17.480–17.900 MHz – Day reception good, night reception varies seasonally, with summer being the best.
  • 19 meters15.00–15.825 MHz – Day reception good, night reception variable, best during summer. Time stations such as WWV are clustered around 15 MHz.
  • 22 meters 13.57–13.87 MHz – Similar to 19 meters; best in summer.
  • 25 meters11.50–12.16 MHz – Generally best during summer; said to be ideal during the period before and after sunset.
  • 31 meters9250–9995 kHz – Good year-round night band; seasonal during the day, with best reception in winter. Time stations are clustered around 10 MHz.
  • 41 meters7100–7600 kHz – Reception varies by region – reasonably good night reception.
  • 49 meters5800–6300 kHz – Good year-round night band; daytime reception is lacking.
  • 60 meters4400–5100 kHz – Mostly used locally in tropical regions, though usable at night. Time stations are clustered around 5000 kHz.
  • 75 meters 3900–4050 kHz – Mostly used in Eastern Hemisphere.
  • 90 meters3200–3400 kHz – Mostly used locally in tropical regions, with limited long-distance reception at night.
  • 120 meters2300–2495 kHz – Mostly used locally in tropical regions, with time stations clustered around 2500 kHz.

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